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1.  Alternative Minimum Tax, Corporate: From The Encyclopedia of...
Minimum taxes are intended to increase tax payments from taxpayers who, under the rules of the regular tax system, are believed to pay too little tax relative to a more standard measure of ther income. The U.S. federal income tax has both a personal and a corporate alternative minimum tax (AMT). The complex corporate tax is designed to increase the income tax on businesses by adjusting for a wide range of preferences awarded to corporations under the standard system. This article details the AMT calculation, revenues, and purpose.
2.  Alternative Minimum Tax, Personal: From The Encyclopedia of Taxation...
The personal alternative minimum tax (AMT) requires individuals to calculate their income tax a second way, different from the regular income tax. Separate tax rates and definitions of taxable income apply in each of these tax systems. This article explores the history and justification for the AMT, as well as the treatment of tax preferences in the AMT.
3.  The Alternative Minimum Tax: Assault on the Middle Class
In a tax code with no shortage of ironies, the alternative minimum tax (AMT) stands out. Created by Congress in 1969, it was aimed at millionaires, but relatively few millionaires pay it. It is billed as a low-rate levy, but most of its victims face higher taxes because of it. It undermines two widely lauded reforms of the income tax -- restoring both bracket creep and the marriage penalty. And though nobody favors keeping this Frankenstein alive, it will be very difficult to kill. Welcome to the tax policy twilight zone.
4.  Alternative Alternative Minimum Tax Reform
Like a gathering storm, the full force of the AMT is scheduled to intensify with time. Almost every elected official pledges to do something about the AMT, but just not now since any reform would have substantial costs in foregone revenues. In this note we discuss a politically palatable option: addressing each item in the AMT individually and adjusting the regular tax accordingly. Simply put, Congress would decide on the treatment of an item of income or preference once and only once for the regular tax only.
5.  The Individual Alternative Minimum Tax
A precursor to the current individual alternative minimum tax (AMT) was originally enacted in 1969 to limit the amount of tax sheltering that taxpayers could pursue and to assure that high-income filers paid at least a minimal amount of tax. However, the current AMT has strayed far from those original goals and threatens to grow from a footnote in the tax code to a major component affecting tens of millions of taxpayers every year. This testimony outlines how the AMT works, whom it affects, and why it demands attention. It also discusses possible ways of reforming the AMT and why financing AMT reform or repeal is important.
6.  The Individual Alternative Minimum Tax: Historical Data and Projection...
The individual alternative minimum tax (AMT) was originally enacted in 1969 to guarantee that high-income individuals paid at least a minimal amount of tax. Due to design flaw, however, the AMT threatens to grow from a footnote in the tax code to a major component affecting tens of millions of taxpayers every year. Absent a change in law, more than 30 million taxpayers will become subject to the AMT by 2010. This document presents and discusses updated estimates of AMT participation, revenue, and the distribution of AMT liability.
7.  The Individual Alternative Minimum Tax: A Data Update
The individual alternative minimum tax (AMT) was intended to guarantee that high income people paid at least some tax, but it is poorly designed. Absent a change in law, close to 30 million taxpayers will become subject to the AMT by 2010. This data update presents new data for the tables in our July 2003 Tax Notes article and expands on the reform options presented in the Spring 2003 Journal of Economic Perspectives article. We also briefly explain the tables.
8.  The Individual Alternative Minimum Tax: Historical Data and Projection...
The alternative minimum tax (AMT), which originally targeted high-income taxpayers, requires annual legislation to prevent it from affecting millions of middle-income individuals each year. There are two primary reasons for the AMT?s broadening impact; its parameters are not indexed for inflation and the 2001-2006 tax cuts reduced regular tax liability without changing AMT liability. In 2009, four million taxpayers will pay $33.5 billion in AMT, but without congressional action that number will rise to 27 million owing $102 billion in 2010. This paper describes the AMT and provides TPC?s latest estimates of AMT coverage, revenue, and distribution.
9.  The Individual Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT): 12 Facts and Projections
Congress originally enacted a minimum tax in 1969 to guarantee that high-income individuals paid at least a minimal amount of tax. Under today?s alternative minimum tax (AMT), middle- and upper-income taxpayers must add a number of preference items to their taxable income, subtract a special AMT exemption, and calculate their tax according to the AMT rules. If the tax under those rules turns out to be higher than their regular income tax, taxpayers pay the difference as AMT. Unless Congress acts, 26.8 million taxpayers will be affected by the AMT in 2008.
10.  The Individual Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT): 11 Key Facts and...
The individual alternative minimum tax (AMT) was originally enacted in 1969 to guarantee that high-income individuals paid at least a minimal amount of tax. Middle- and upper-income taxpayers must add a number of so-called ?preference items? to their taxable income, subtract a special AMT exemption, and calculate their tax according to the AMT tax schedule. If the tax under that schedule is higher than the regular income tax, taxpayers pay the difference as AMT. This document outlines 11 key facts and projections about the AMT, including its effects on taxpayers and prospects for its reform.
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